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Harmonic Learning is a company with a purpose... Creating More Harmony In The World Through Learning. Our Harmonic Work-Styles Model, assessments, and learning programs provide individuals and organizations with a path to strengthen communication, increase interpersonal awareness, and heighten leadership skills.

Harmonic Sharing

Harmonic Learning is happy to share some of our content, videos, worksheets and other information for you to use freely with your teams.

Tuning Pegs

Brian Lowell French

Hi Folks,

If you’re wondering about the banner on the Blog site and the header on the documents, it is a close up picture of tuning pegs on a grand piano (the technical name is tuning pin, but many say peg). I took the picture at a church that we used to attend where I would occasionally play/sing during the service. It was a beautiful, older piano with classic craftsmanship.

The intricacy of parts and pieces within a grand piano must be adjusted perfectly to create harmony.

The intricacy of parts and pieces within a grand piano must be adjusted perfectly to create harmony.

Many people are unaware that there are actually multiple strings for each note on a piano (typically 3 for the higher notes, 2 for the mid-lower notes, then only 1 for the very low-bass notes) that must be precisely tuned to create the correct harmonic tones and overtones of the note (overtones being the secondary, complementary frequencies… the slight ringing noise).

All of the strings have to be tuned in a certain “temperament” to be compatible, where the tones at different frequencies will “beat” (the slight warbling when vibrating) in such a way that they resonate together properly. Most pianos today are tuned to what is called “equal temperament” which allows it to played in any key without too much disturbance in the tones and overtones.

When you look “under the hood” of a piano, it is fascinating to see the intricacy of the many parts and pieces and how they all must be perfectly adjusted to ensure the proper tone of the instrument is achieved.

I think this is a great analogy of a workplace, where it is equally fascinating to see the intricacy of the many people and groups and how they all must be perfectly adjusted to ensure the proper tone of the workplace is achieved.

When a piano is perfectly tuned, it creates a wonderful and complex resonance in the notes and harmonies. But if conditions cause it to go out of tune, it causes a harsh and unappealing dissonance in the notes.

When a work-team is perfectly tuned, there is a wonderful and complex resonance between the individuals that creates harmony. But if conditions cause the team to be out of tune, it causes a harsh and unappealing dissonance between the people.

Great leaders have an equal temperament and stay in tune regardless of conditions. Their message resonates with the team to create harmony. This is what it means to be a Harmonic Leader.

This is why I chose this particular picture as the banner for our Sharing Blog. The hope is that everything we share here will help you to become a Harmonic Leader.

Stay Tuned,

Brian

Note: If you’re a geek like me, you might enjoy reading a bit about piano tuning and how difficult of a process it is to ensure the instrument is perfectly in-tune.